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    1 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists Food Science & Technology 101 Speaker Name Speaker Title Date (optional)
    2 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 2 Agenda What is Food Science and Technology? Careers in Food Science Education Internships Questions
    3 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 3 Have you ever wondered? If low fat cookies taste the same as regular ones? Or how the flavor of a new food product is chosen? Or why packaged ready-to-eat cut fruit stays crisp and does not turn brown?
    4 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 4 Then Food Science may be a career for you!!
    5 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 5 What is Food Science? Food Science is the discipline in which biology, physical sciences, and engineering are used to study the nature of foods, the causes of their deterioration, and the principles underlying food processing.
    6 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 6 What is Food Technology? Food Technology is the application of food science to the selection, preservation, processing, packaging, distribution, and use of safe, nutritious, and wholesome food.
    7 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 7 What does a Food Scientist do? A Food Scientist studies the physical, microbiological, and chemical makeup of food. Depending on their area of specialization, Food Scientists may develop ways to process, preserve, package, or store food, according to industry and government specifications and regulations.
    8 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 8 The Myths About Food Science Food Science is NOT Home Economics Food Science is NOT Only Nutrition Food Science is NOT Only Cooking
    9 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 9 Why Food Science? The food industry is the 2nd largest manufacturing sector with more than $600 billion in retail sales There are generally more positions available than graduating students to fill them The USDA reports that between 2005 and 2010, U.S. universities will not graduate enough people with food, agriculture, and natural resource degrees to meet demand
    10 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 10 Why Food Science? It is an applied science: You could see the product you worked on in the grocery store. It’s fun! Food scientists get to play with their food! It’s exciting! Food scientists never get bored. They work in the lab, in the pilot plant, and travel to different plants sometimes all around the world. The Food Network’s Alton Brown at IFT’s 2006 Annual Meeting
    11 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 11 Why Food Science? In 2005: The median starting salary was $48,000 The median salary was $78,000 The median salary by degree was: BS: $70,000 MS: $76,000 Ph.D.: $92,500 Source: Food Technology magazine, February 2006
    12 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 12 Who can you work for? Food processors Ingredient manufacturer/suppliers Academia Self-employed/Consultant Government Non-government organizations Foodservice Testing laboratory
    13 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 13 What kind of jobs are available? Product Development Scientist Processing Engineer Microbiologist Sensory Scientist Culinary Scientist Flavor Chemist Packaging Engineer Analytical Chemist Academia Government Official Operations Logistics Supply Chain Management Marketing Regulatory Affairs Legal Affairs Government Relations Quality Assurance Food Safety
    14 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 14 Process Engineer Develops processing procedures and equipment New Product Development/Brand Maintenance Develops processes and equipment to process new products and flavors Quality Improvements Improves processes and equipment to improve efficiency and quality of products Responsibilities: Bench-top/Pilot plant process/equipment development Testing Scale-up/Commercialization Troubleshooting
    15 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 15 Food Microbiologist Contributes to the knowledge about the behavior of microorganisms in food and processing environments New products/Brand maintenance Conducts tests to verify shelf-life of new food products Research Develops new and/or rapid testing methods Studies “good” (those responsible for fermentation) and “bad” (those responsible for food borne illness) bacteria Responsibilities Experimental design Perform, analyze, and report experimental results Troubleshooting
    16 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 16 Product Development Scientist Responsible for product formulations New Product Development Takes a product from concept to formulation Brand Maintenance Creates line extensions (i.e. new flavors) Quality Improvement Makes changes as necessary (i.e. supply chain interruption, consumer complaints) Responsibilities: Bench-top development Testing Plant scale-up Commercialization Troubleshooting
    17 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 17 Analytical Chemist Analyzes and conducts tests on products and ingredients Determines and sets specifications Flavor Chemist Develops flavors for the flavor and food industries and/or investigates the compounds responsible for flavor in food products Responsibilities Bench-top/Pilot plant Testing Scale-up Commercialization Troubleshoot Experimental design Perform, analyze, and report experimental results Chemist
    18 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 18 Sensory Scientist Evokes, measures, analyzes and interprets those responses to products that are perceived by the senses New Product Development/Brand Maintenance Investigates what consumers like and why Quality Improvement Investigates whether consumers can tell a difference when an ingredient in a product is changed, they may also determine if the change was preferred Basic Research Studies perception and develops and/or improves testing methodologies Responsibilities: Designs sensory experiments Analyzes results using statistics Reports experimental results to product development Troubleshooting Sensory Scientists can conduct tests to determine if consumers like pulp in their juice. Red lights are sometimes used to mask visual differences. Case Study: Juice
    19 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 19 Packaging Engineer Develops the packaging for food products New products/Brand maintenance Develops packaging for new and current products Develops new forms of packaging Quality improvements Develops packaging that is easier to use and easier to open Responsibilities: Bench-top/Pilot plant process/equipment development Testing Scale-up/Commercialization Troubleshoot
    20 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 20 Quality Control Ensures that food products meet the desired specifications Supplier Management- Ingredient and Packaging Management & Approval Co-Manufacturing and Co-Packaging Management & Approval Operations Quality- Support Manufacturing Facilities New Product Innovation- Responsible for Quality Support on Innovation Initiatives Responsibilities: Testing Microbial Chemical Other product specifications Troubleshoot
    21 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 21 Consumer Safety Officer Responsible for publishing, implementing, and enforcing regulations for government agencies Investigates complaints of injury, illness, or death caused by a regulated product Initiates actions against violators Advises industry, state and local officials and consumers on enforcement policies, methods, and interpretation of regulations Plans and directs regulatory programs Develops inspection procedures and techniques Responsibilities: Rulemaking Inspection/Enforcement Troubleshooting
    22 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 22 It takes a lot of work and resources to make a food product!
    23 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 23 How do you become a food scientist? Attend an IFT approved college degree program Eligible for scholarships Eligible to participate in competitions Gain hands on experience Research lab Internship
    24 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 24 IFT Approved Schools Alabama A&M University University of Alberta University of Arkansas Auburn University Brigham Young University University of British Columbia University of California-Davis California Polytechnic State University California State University, Fresno Clemson University Cornell University University of Delaware University of Florida University of Georgia University of Guelph University of Idaho University of Illinois Iowa State University Kansas State University University of Kentucky Louisiana State University University of Maine University of Manitoba University of Maryland
    25 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 25 IFT Approved Schools Continued… University of Massachusetts McGill University Instituto Technologico y de Estudios Superiores De Monterrey Michigan State University University of Minnesota Mississippi State University University of Missouri University of Nebraska North Carolina State University North Dakota State University Ohio State University Oregon State University Pennsylvania State University Purdue University Rutgers-The State University San Jose State University University of Tennessee Texas A&M University Tuskegee University Utah State University Virginia Tech Washington State University University of Wisconsin-Madison
    26 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 26 Typical Food Science Curriculum Biology Chemistry Physics Organic Chemistry Math/Calculus Biochemistry Quantitative Analysis Physical Chemistry Food Law Food Chemistry Food Engineering Food Microbiology Food Analysis Food Processing Product Development Sensory Analysis Nutrition Commodities (milk, meat, produce) Social Science Foreign Language Economics Statistics English Communications
    27 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 27 Degree Options Food Science Concentrations include: Operations Management, Sensory Evaluation, Food Chemistry, Food Microbiology, Food Engineering, Food Safety, Food Packaging, Food Policy, and others… Degrees are offered at the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. level Related Degrees: Biochemistry Engineering Chemistry Packaging Science Nutrition Science
    28 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 28 Other programs Certified Culinary Scientist (CCS) Food Science + Food Service Experience + CCS Validation Exam Culinology Degree: Cal Poly Pomona/Orange Coast College Cal State University, Fresno  Clemson University Dominican University/Kendall College Southwest Minnesota State University  University of Nebraska-Lincoln / Metropolitan Community College University of Cincinnati / Cincinnati State Technical and Community College University of Massachusetts-Amherst
    29 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 29 Study Abroad Opportunities International Food Laws in Western Europe Offered by Michigan State University Travels to UK, France, Switzerland and Italy International Food Laws in Asia Offered by Michigan State University Travels to Japan, South Korea and Hong Kong
    30 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 30 Are there scholarships? Yes! The Institute of Food Technologist’s offers scholarships to high school graduates or seniors expecting to graduate from high school entering college for the first time in an approved food science/technology program.
    31 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 31 Hands on Experience Research Assistanships Most labs on campus will hire undergraduate students to conduct research Many positions are paid!! They are a great opportunity to apply what you will learn in class Internships Major food companies offer internships to undergraduate and graduate students They usually hire a variety of majors (food science, chemistry, biology, engineering) Placement can be in the plant or in research & development Many of them include housing and are paid!! They are a great opportunity to see how the food industry works
    32 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 32 What can you do now? Talk to your guidance counselor Ask to see the Careers in food science resource packet they received from IFT and Discovery Education in 2006 Talk to your science teachers Ask them about The science and scientists behind the food resource packet they received from IFT and Discover Education in 2006
    33 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 33 What can you do now? Gain experience Join a club Science Olympiad Future Farmers of America (FFA) Conduct independent research At your school At a local university Many universities have summer research programs for high school students in food science Intern/Co-Op Contact a local plant or food company
    34 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 34 Want to learn more? Visit: http://www.ift.org http://school.discovery.com/foodscience/ Find a Food Scientist: A database of IFT members who are willing to provide more information about the field of food science to you http://members.ift.org/IFT/Education/TeacherResources/findafoodscientist.htm
    35 : © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists 35 Questions?
    36 : Headquarters 525 W. Van Buren Street Suite 1000 Chicago, IL 60607 312.782.8424 ift.org Washington, D.C. Office 1025 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 503 Washington, D.C. 20036 202.466.5980

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