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    From Cradle to Career Preparing San Jose’s Youth for the Digital

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    1 : 1 From Cradle to Career: Preparing San Jose’s Youth for the Digital Age Where We Stand Now: A Preliminary Overview March 2001 Prepared by: Resource Development Associates (925) 299-7729
    2 : 2 Population
    3 : 3 Background In Santa Clara County there has been a steady increase in the Latino and Asian/Pacific Islander populations during the 1990’s At the current rate of change, the Asian/Pacific Islander population will surpass that of Latinos early in the 2000 decade Conversely, in the City of San Jose, the Latino population is growing at a faster rate than the Asian/Pacific Islander population Population Population
    4 : 4 Population e Source: Adapted from US Census Bureau & California Dep’t. of Finance Projections
    5 : 5 Source: Adapted from US Census Bureau & California Dep’t. of Finance Projections Population
    6 : 6 Infancy and Early Childhood
    7 : 7 Background Low birth weight babies are ten times more likely to die in their first year than normal weight babies. Birth weight is an indicator of overall perinatal health: it is impacted by adequacy of health care, mother’s nutrition, smoking, and substance use. How are we doing? Rates in San Jose have consistently worsened over the last decade. City and County rates are now about the same as the state rate. Low Birthweight Births Infancy and Early Childhood
    8 : 8 Source: CA Department of Health Services, Birth Cohort Files Infancy and Early Childhood
    9 : 9 Background Teen mothers are at high risk for school drop-out, for being abused, and for poverty. Babies of teen mothers are at high risk for infant mortality, for being abused, and for poor educational outcomes. How are we doing? Rates for San Jose have declined by 20% over the past decade. Births to teens Infancy and Early Childhood
    10 : 10 Source: CA Department of Health Services, Birth Cohort Files Infancy and Early Childhood
    11 : 11 Background In 1998, 60% of children under 14 had a single working parent or both parents in the workforce. How are we doing? Over the past five years, the number of children under 14 has grown five times as fast as the number of childcare slots. Need is greatest for infant slots. Only 12% of the estimated need is met by current childcare supply. Preschool care costs an average of $135 per week per child; this is two-thirds of the salary of a full-time minimum-wage worker. Infancy and Early Childhood Childcare
    12 : 12 Source: Kids in Common, Silicon Valley Children’s Report Card
    13 : 13 Basic Needs
    14 : 14 Background Although high family income does not predict to educational success, low family income does correlate with educational failure. Economic inequality has been shown to be linked to lowered health status and increased educational failure for all income levels. How are we doing? Through most of the 1990’s income of the bottom 20% of households declined or remained stagnant. Basic Needs Income
    15 : 15 In 1999, after 7 years of economic growth, the bottom 20% of households finally attained the same median income that they had had in 1992. In the same period, the income of the top 20% of households increased by 20%. Basic Needs Income, continued
    16 : 16 Adjusted to represent a household of four, 1999 dollars Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs
    17 : 17 Basic Needs Source: Occupational Outlook Quarterly - Winter 2000
    18 : 18 Background Housing costs have a dramatic impact on the stability of communities. Higher housing costs lead to longer commutes and less parental time spent with families. How are we doing? In 2000, only 16% of houses were affordable to a family with the median County income. Over the past decade, median rents have gone up over 50% while median household income has increased less than 25%. A preschool teacher would have to pay 80% of her income to afford the median rental. Basic Needs Housing
    19 : 19 Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs
    20 : 20 Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs
    21 : 21 Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs
    22 : 22 Education
    23 : 23 High school graduation Background? High school drop-out rates have been shown to be strongly correlated to parental education level, family support for education and the student’s level of hope for the future. How are we doing? Four-year drop-out rates have declined significantly in the state and Santa Clara County, but have remained static in San Jose. Drop-out rates vary greatly by ethnicity. Latino youth are particularly at risk for dropping out. Education
    24 : 24 Source: California Department of Education, Education Demographics Unit Education
    25 : 25 How are we doing? Reading was the major problem area for all categories of student and all districts. Between 2nd and 11th grade, English proficient students’ reading score fell by 20% compared to the national average. Between 2nd and 11th grade, limited-English proficient students’ reading scores fell by 60%. For language and math scores, non-LEP students scored well above the national average, but large groups of LEP students are very much at-risk. Education Test Scores
    26 : 26 Education Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website
    27 : 27 Source: California Department of Education, Ed-Data Website Education
    28 : 28 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website Education
    29 : 29 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website Education
    30 : 30 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website Education
    31 : 31 Career Preparation
    32 : 32 Preparation for secondary school Background A two-year community college degree will a minimum requirement for a well-paying job in the digital future. How are we doing? The number of high school graduates in San Jose completing the required course for UC/CSU admission has grown dramatically over the past decade. Completion of US/CSU requirements varies dramatically by ethnicity. Drop-out rates vary greatly by ethnicity. Only 22% of Latino and 9% of Pacific Islander youth completed these requirements. Career Preparation
    33 : 33 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website
    34 : 34 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website
    35 : 35 Community Assets
    36 : 36 Background The Search Institute’s Cornerstone Project surveyed: 7,000 7th-12th Graders in Santa Clara County and 100,000 6th-12th Graders Nationally regarding 40 Developmental Assets. How are we doing? Santa Clara youth fare poorer in relation to national youth on External Assets (support from adults and the community). Santa Clara youth fare better than national youth on most Internal Assets (commitment to learning, personal values, and social competencies) Developmental Assets Community Assets
    37 : 37 How are we doing? Santa Clara youth fare poorer on Positive Identity Internal Assets (e.g., self-esteem). Youth feel self-motivated to do well. Youth perceive adults and community as disconnected and uncaring. Students do not feel engaged at school and report being frequently bored. Developmental Assets, continued Community Assets
    38 : 38 High Points of the Cornerstone Project Survey: Percentages of Santa Clara County Youth who experienced these assets: 62% feel family life provides high levels of love and support. 62% accept and takes personal responsibility. 65% are optimistic about their personal future. 66% are motivated to do well in school. 73% do at least one hour of homework per day. Developmental Assets, continued Community Assets
    39 : 39 Low Points of the Cornerstone Project Survey: Only 35% receive support from 3 or more non-parent adults. Only 30% experience caring neighbors. Only 24% see parents and other adults model positive, responsible behaviors. Only 22% feel school provides a caring, encouraging environment. Only 15% feel that adults value youth. Developmental Assets, continued Community Assets

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