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    Add as Friend How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components

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    1 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk
    2 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk A relay board is basically a printed circuit board on which there are a number of relay switches. Before we get into applications, let’s quickly define what a relay switch actually is.
    3 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk In bare terms, a relay is simply that – a switch. It throws from one state to another – the familiar 1 and 0 of electronics and binary code. The relay is thrown from one state to another when an electrical current is passed through it, or where an electromagnetic action flips the switch mechanically.
    4 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk In the latter case, which is the most common, the electromagnet is powered by the electric current – and causes the relay switch to flip to its alternate state..
    5 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk This may either turn something on or off by depending on the logic of the rest of the circuit will result in a positive action (like a circuit firing up) or a negative one (like a trip switch being thrown and shutting down a circuit).
    6 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk The relay board is most commonly seen in the modern home as a consumer unit (the thing your mum used to call a fuse board, but which is now known as an RCD).
    7 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk The electromagnet in an RCD unit fires when a current over a certain level passes through it, causing the relay switch to turn that circuit off. This prevents overload and dangerous currents being passed through the wiring in a home, and dramatically reduces the cause of electrical fires in older properties.
    8 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk The relay board, then, is used where a range of circuits are to be controlled by one signal; or where you need to control a circuit in isolation from the control circuit. So you fire the control circuit, which flips the relay switch (thereby disconnecting the control circuit) .
    9 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk The circuit you are controlling comes to life. When that circuit has lost its current, the electromagnet controlling the relay switch lets go and it click back to position 0, until the control circuit is fired again.
    10 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk Applications include the amplification of digital signals; and the installation of for example, low voltage lighting control switches. The relay board is present between the mains power source (which has a high voltage) and the light switch, which uses low voltage wires for insertion into partition walls.
    11 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk This is a fire safety and cost control measure – office partition walls are frequently moved, so it makes no sense to hardwire them with expensive mains wiring. In many hobbyist projects, the relay board is there to act as a logic gate for the functions of your circuits.
    12 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk A switch is always either on or off (1 or 0) – but of course when you have an array of switches you can quickly build complicated Boolean procedures that allow you to do quite sophisticated things with even a relatively small number of components.
    13 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk Normally, Boolean AND is achieved by connecting a series of normally open relays; while NAND and NOR are achieved when you connect normally closed relays in specific ways.
    14 : How to Use a Relay Board – Applications for Electrical Components http://proto-pic.co.uk Relay board components are manufactured in two states – normally closed, or normally open.

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