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    Add as FriendNUCLEAR CHEMISTRY

    by: sankar

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    1 : SANKAR.G DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY DON BOSCO COLLEGE DHARMAPURI
    2 : Nuclear chemistry
    3 :
    4 : NUCLEAR REACTION IN A CHEMICAL REACTION ATOMS OF THE REACTANTS COMBINE BY A REARRANGEMENT OF EXTRANUCLEAR ELECTRONS BUT THE NUCLEI OF THE ATOMS UNCHANGED. IN A NUCLEAR REACTION ,THE NUMBER OF PROTONS AND NEUTRONS IN THE NUCLEUS CHANGES TO FORM A NEW ELEMENT. A STUDY OF THE NUCLEAR CHANGES IN ATOMIC IS TERMED NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY.
    5 : Historical Perspective Henri Becquerel 1896 - Discovers natural radioactivity
    6 : © 2003 John Wiley and Sons Publishers
    7 : Historical Perspective Marie Curie Polish chemist marries Pierre Curie, French physicist In 1896 Marie curie undertook a systematic study of radioactive substance In 1898 they isolated Radium.
    8 : Stability of nucleus
    9 : Neutron-Proton Ratios Any element with more than one proton (i.e., anything but hydrogen) will have repulsions between the protons in the nucleus. A strong nuclear force helps keep the nucleus from flying apart. Neutrons play a key role stabilizing the nucleus. Therefore, the ratio of neutrons to protons is an important factor.
    10 : Neutron-Proton Ratios For smaller nuclei (Z ? 20) stable nuclei have a neutron-to-proton ratio close to 1:1.
    11 : Neutron-Proton Ratios As nuclei get larger, it takes a greater number of neutrons to stabilize the nucleus.
    12 : Stable Nuclei The shaded region in the figure shows what nuclides would be stable, the so-called belt of stability.
    13 : Stable Nuclei Nuclei above this belt have too many neutrons. They tend to decay by emitting beta particles.
    14 : Stable Nuclei There are no stable nuclei with an atomic number greater than 83. These nuclei tend to decay by alpha emission.
    15 : Radioactive Series Large radioactive nuclei cannot stabilize by undergoing only one nuclear transformation. They undergo a series of decays until they form a stable nuclide (often a nuclide of lead).
    16 : NUCLEAR REACTIONS
    17 : NUCLEAR FISSION
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    19 : © 2003 John Wiley and Sons Publishers
    20 :
    21 : The world’s first atomic explosion, July 16, 1945 at Alamogordo, New Mexico. © 2003 John Wiley and Sons Publishers
    22 : The uranium bomb, 3m (10 ft) long and 0.7 m (2.3 ft) in diameter, was called “Little Boy.” © 2003 John Wiley and Sons Publishers Courtesy National Archives, photo no. 77-BT-187
    23 : Figure 4.11: The operation of fission bombs. © 2003 John Wiley and Sons Publishers
    24 : Little Boy was the first nuclear weapon used in warfare. It exploded approximately 1,800 feet over Hiroshima, Japan, on the morning of August 6, 1945, with a force equal to 13,000 tons of TNT. Fat Man was the second nuclear weapon used in warfare. Dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945, Fat Man devastated more than two square miles of the city and caused approximately 45,000 immediate deaths. Fat Man was a more complicated and powerful plutonium (Pu-239) implosion weapon that exploded with a force equal to 20 kilotons of TNT.
    25 : NUCLEAR FUSION
    26 :
    27 :
    28 : NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS
    29 :
    30 : Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)
    31 : ANY QUESTIONS Silicotungstic acid +heterocyclic compounds
    32 : THANKS FROM G

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